In Conversation with Manthe Ribane, a Soweto based Performance Artist

Manthe Ribane is a performance wunderkind. She is the muse in the NOT x Chris Saunders fashion and photography collaboration shot in Johannesburg that we’ve recently been featuring, and the last interview to close out the series.

She shares a few thoughts on her inspiration for each of the images shot by Chris Saunders.

The NOT x Vernac character is a global story. How can you define a bag that can create so many jobs around the world, protect so many lives, but still be one with you, still keep your stories and your secrets? It’s just a bag, but it’s not just a bag.  That’s the idea behind that performance. Also it was shot in the Noord, the place that connects you to every place you need to be in Joburg.

For the Not x Floyd Avenue,  outfit that character is someone who could cover the world, like a mother. I will represent, I will fight for you. It’s crazy how an outfit can just transform you. She’s wearing a crown, but she’s still wearing a dungaree. The lips are gold, meaning she spoke gold in the city of gold. For me, the face paint is both playful and powerful. Black is very dark and powerful, aggressive. But the gold keeps it godly and mysterious.

For NOT x Dr. Pachanga  character where my face is painted gold, I really felt golden. You can come from the dingiest place, but it’s about how are you going to take yourself, as trash or as golden? Nobody knows your struggle or what you’ve left behind at home, but it’s how you are going to represent yourself out to the world that matters the most.

The last shoot, the Not x Macdee giant puppet in Orange Farm was an emotional experience for me. I could see the pain in the kids eyes, waiting for hope and faith of steps further. The outfit made people laugh and excited. That feeling made me both happy and sad at the same time. I wish I had a million rand to help them all, create sport activities, art exhibitions, job creation, reading creation centers, to create a powerful journey of hope for them. I hope that the project will make people aware that life is about making a difference, and taking a dream to a beyond extraordinary expectation.

Source | anotherafrica.net

Images courtesy of Chris Saunders. All rights reserved.

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  • 08.26.2014
  • 54 Notes

Photographs in Between Place and Memory

Reviewing a monograph on Ugandan photographer Deo Kyakulagira’s archives

Photographs often testify in the court of the real. In this case, the real is a more nuanced story of life in 1950s, 60s and 70s Uganda. Deo Kyakulagira’s photographs complicate various accounts of Uganda during the Amin regime.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

All images courtesy of Deo Kyakulagira, Andrea Stultiens and History in Progress Uganda.

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  • 08.20.2014
  • 41 Notes

In Conversation with Macdonald Mfolo, an Orange Farm based Costume and Puppetmaker

Sharing insights on collaboration, the power of doing things yourself and locality.

Performance dancer Manthe Ribane who is currently on tour with Die Antwoord bring Macdee’s collaborative costume meets puppet come alive. This project is one of 4 collaborations between New York based designer Jenny Lai and creators based in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Soweto and Orange Farm.

Read the interview.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Chris Saunders. All rights reserved.

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  • 08.15.2014
  • 9 Notes

Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou | Demoiselles de Porto-Novo

Existing within the faded walls of a family home at the centre of one city’s complex history, these are the Demoiselles de Porto Novo.

As the title would suggest, the solitary figure within these images are of young women from the port city, and former capital of French Dahomey. Demoiselles de Porto-Novo the portraiture series, is part of a broader body of work and project entitled Citizens of Port-Novo by Beninois photographer Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou.

Discover more.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of  Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou and Jack Bell Gallery. All rights reserved.

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  • 08.11.2014
  • 206 Notes

In Conversation with Floyd Avenue, a Soweto-based Fashion Designer

We caught up with Floyd Manotana (aka Floyd Avenue) and Smarteez member. He talks to us about fashion, inspiration and Soweto and his recent collaboration on the NOT x Chris Saunders fashion and photography project which will be shown in New York during September fashion week.

Floyd sitting in his converted studio in Dobsonville, February 2014. Photo | Chris Saunders.

Read the interview.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Chris Saunders. All rights reserved.

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  • 08.08.2014
  • 46 Notes
" Regardless of where we are, when I make a portrait, it all starts with respect. When I am approaching people to photograph, I approach them as Thabiso Sekgala, as myself first. Then I am a photographer. I always try to portray people in a very dignified way—that’s what I take from The Black Photo Album. I am getting sick and tired of seeing African people being portrayed as victims, or passive people, and always in a bad light." Thabiso Sekgala
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  • 08.04.2014
  • 18 Notes

Berlin to Bulawayo: In Conversation with South African artist Thabiso Sekgala

In his photographs, Thabiso Sekgala explores the relationship between geography and social identity. He gives his series allusive, meditative titles, and his formal approach to composition is quiet but precise. Working consistently with square-framed, medium format film, he displays a sharpened consideration of geometry, illustrated by aspects in the landscape such as shadows, the painted guidelines on a street, architectural structures, and repetitive details.

Read the interview.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Thabiso Sekgala and The Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg and Cape Town. All rights reserved.

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  • 08.04.2014
  • 135 Notes
POPCAP’14 WINNER | PATRICK WILLOCQ

Kinshasa based photographer Patrick Willoq’s fictional staged photographs I am Walé Respect Me, is the result of a collaboration between Ekonda pygmies, an ethno-musicologist, artist and many artisans of the forest. Focused on visually narrating the initiation ritual of the Walé women (young mothers) in Democratic Republic of Congo. Willoq’s describes these images as visual depictions of the songs sung by the Walé whilst in seclusion. Each aural tale has a codified structure yet is made unique by each young mother. She sings of her loneliness, whilst astutely praising herself to the discredit of her fellow rivals – other Walés. Patrick Willocqu was born in 1969 in Strasbourg, France. He lives in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Patrick Willocq and piclet.org. All rights reserved.

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  • 07.28.2014
  • 358 Notes

POPCAP’14 WINNERS | Anoek Steketee and Eefje Blankevoort

Love Radio is a transmedia documentary by journalist and filmaker Eefje Blankevoort and photographer Anoek Steketee about the complex process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda. It is based on a popular radio soap program – Musekeweya (‘New Dawn’). Combining film with photography, audio, text and archive material, this ground breaking project eloquently straddles the boundaries between fact and fiction. Blankevoort and Steketee write that their photographs “do not take a purely documentary approach. The camera is used not only to raise social issues, but also as a tool for the imagination. By playing with light and partially directing the subjects, alienating images emerge, with the surroundings as a gloomy stage set.” Eefje Blankevoort was born in 1978 in Montreal, Canada. Anoek Steketee was born in 1974 in Hoorn, The Netherlands. They both live in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Source | anotherafrica.net

Images courtesy of Eefje Blankewoort and Anoek Steketee and piclet.org. All rights reserved.

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  • 07.28.2014
  • 24 Notes

POPCAP’14 WINNER | Léonard Pongo

Brussels based photographer Léonard Pongo presents The Uncanny, a black and white documentary series he describes that “tries to show the collateral impact of the war instead of the direct hits.” Shot in the Democratic Republic of Congo post the 2011 elections, Pongo wanted to see his country beyond a singular narrative of crisis.  Through time spent with family members, political and religious figures his lens captures intimate moments, sometimes sharp sometimes hazy.  His subjective take as he asserts is, “not trying to deliver a truth but striving to understand people’s realities and construct my own.” Léonard Pongo was born in 1988 in Liège, Belgium. He lives in Brussels, Belgium.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Léonard Pongo and piclet.org. All rights reserved.

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  • 07.28.2014
  • 57 Notes

POPCAP’14 WINNER | ILAN GODFREY

Cape Town based photographer Ilan Godfrey’s series Legacy of the Mine examines one of South Africa’s most important economic enterprises: mining. He writes, “mineral exploitation by means of cheap and disposable labour has brought about national economic growth, making the mining industry the largest industrial sector in South Africa.” Through images documented over a period between 2011 – 2013, Godfrey uses his camera to probe the underbelly of a mega-industry and its unsavory effects on communities and lives that he calls “forgotten”. Ilan Godfrey was born in 1980 in Johannesburg, South Africa. He lives in Cape Town, South Africa.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Ilan Godfrey and piclet.org. All rights reserved.

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  • 07.28.2014
  • 10 Notes

POPCAP’14 WINNER | Joana Choumali

Abidjan based photographer Joana Choumali’s series Hââbré, The Last Generation explores scarification – markings created through superficial incisions made to the body. Hââbré means both writing and scarification in Kô, a Burkinabe language. As documents of the physical traces of shared values, and traditions of self-imaging within cultural groups, her images reflect on how these are subject to change. Once the norm, and having high social value as she describes, individuals bearing these vestiges of the past, are now somewhat “excluded”. Joana Choumali was born in 1974 in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. She lives in Abidjan Cococy, Ivory Coast.

Source | anotherafrica.net

Images courtesy of Joana Choumali and piclet.org. All rights reserved.

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  • 07.28.2014
  • 105 Notes